Light at The End of The Rabbit Hole — The Shift in Burden of Proof

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A single line in the Preliminary Assessment provided by the UAP Task Force in June is generally ignored, but it might have fuelled the urge to create a permanent office to carry out the duties being performed by the temporary UAP Task Force. One sentence explains the report’s fascinating “Other” category. The task force’s scientists and experts determined that certain objects in the other group can only be comprehended pending scientific advancements. This is a thoughtful and sobering concept.

They are essentially conceding that the Phenomenon observed by Navy and Air Force troops is indistinguishable from magic.

This judgement for the necessity for more scientific breakthroughs has mostly been rejected by notable sceptics. Those who are strongly set in their unique worldview and feel bold enough to contradict firsthand reports of experienced fighter pilots and radar operators that have provided explanations ranging from balloons to birds. These sorts of alternate hypotheses have been embraced as counterpoints to extraterrestrial visitations in mainstream media reporting, to the detriment of science.

However, with the passing of the new National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), respectable media sources must filter out these sorts of notions.

For decades, whistleblowers and researchers have argued that there is a culture of secrecy and shame around the UFO issue. They stated that interactions were never reported up through the command chain, and that if they were, the protagonist was mocked. According to the Preliminary Assessment released in June, many UFO sightings likely went unreported, owing to the stigma.

The new Defense Authorization Act mandates that the new UFO office create processes to coordinate and streamline the gathering, reporting, and analysis of occurrences of aerial phenomena across the Department of Defense. It is also in charge of creating processes to ensure that such occurrences are reported in a timely and uniform manner.

Perhaps it is time to consider what else whistleblowers and researchers have claimed.

As a member of the 81st Tactical Fighter Wing’s base security, retired USAF veteran John Burroughs possessed a “Secret” security clearance. But he had no clue, back in late December 1980, that he had begun on a secret operation when he wandered into a nearby woodland to examine what British intelligence termed an Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon event. And yet, based on the dispute surrounding his service records, it appears to be exactly what happened. Because of the sensitivity of the incident, John Burroughs’ medical records were classified and kept from him. Senator John McCain and his team made a kind attempt to help Burroughs receive the assistance he required, so he could get the medical benefits from the Veterans Association.

With the new NDAA, the Department of Defense’s office of UFO research is now responsible with producing an evaluation of any health-related consequences for those who have seen unexplained aerial phenomena to congress.

These changes and congressional mandates will be a major issue for sceptics who muddy the waters in order to maintain their self serving worldview. It would be fascinating to see how Neil DeGrasse Tyson reconciles the establishment of an entire office to investigate a phenomena he clearly labels as “computer glitches.” A scientist should never be embarrassed about a prospective idea, but he should be embarrassed about their lack of investigation or interest in Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon, especially when dismissing it in the public domain and contradicting common knowledge.

Another line item adopted and placed into the new NDAA requires Congress to be kept up to date on any activities undertaken to capture or exploit newly found unexplained airborne phenomena. If Mick West’s views are even somewhat correct, Congress will be briefed on balloons, seagulls, and their own airborne weaponry in a laborious waste of time. I have a feeling this isn’t the case.

Jason Colavito, a self-described popular culture critic, tweeted this morning, strongly implying that the new law was an attempt by a tiny number of UFO enthusiasts to deceive Congress and steal from American taxpayers. If this is accurate, and the Department of Defense has been infiltrated through legislation by a rogue group of government employees, the democracy of the United States of America is in serious trouble. This way of thought, on the other hand, is highly conspiratorial and harmful to science if presented without any evidence or documentation that supports the theory.

Mainstream media must do better than invite misinformation operatives like Jason Colavito and Mick West to give a contrarian point of view on the air.

Those days have passed.

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