Stanford & Virginia School of Medicine Are Studying “Experiencers”

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Researchers from Stanford School of Medicine and the University of Virginia School of Medicine are researching psychic experiencers and memories of past lives in children.

  • Reflect On:

    Today's knowledge is inspired by yesterday's forbidden issues. Will quantum physics be able to connect the unknowns to the knowns?

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There is significant academic research being conducted by reputed scientists regarding the psychic aspect of the UFO phenomenon.

Jacque Valle, a well-known scientist, and researcher has alluded to the psychic aspect in a study co-authored with Dr. Eric W Davis titled “Incommensurability, Orthodoxy, and the Physics of High Strangeness: A 6-Layer Model for Anomalous Phenomena”. The effect category is classified as psychic because it involves a type of phenomenon commonly found in parapsychology literature, such as impressions of communication without a direct sensory channel, motions and sounds without a specific cause, and motions and sounds outside the observed presence of a UAP.

Kit Green is a former CIA officer who is now a Professor of Forensic Neuro-imaging in the Departments of Diagnostic Radiology and Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at Detroit Medical Center and Wayne State University School of Medicine. Over the last 15 years, Dr. Green’s research has focused on the injuries sustained by those who have had anomalous experiences and close encounter events while serving. In early 2018 researchers learned of a scientific study being done by Dr. Green and Dr. Garry Nolan — Rachford and Carlota Harris Professor and Professor of Microbiology & Immunology in the Department of Pathology at Stanford School of Medicine.

Study of Experiencers

The research includes, among others, a set of individuals known as “Experiencers” – people who have Anomalous Mental Phenomena perceived through the senses, such as hallucinations, seeing creatures and orbs, or hearing messages. One potential objective of the study was to uncover personality similarities and, maybe, if “experiences” followed families — implying that genetics may play a role in the experience process itself. Nolan and Green insist that the study’s goal is not to verify the veracity of the event, but rather to see whether there are any medical or family ties. Dr. Nolan mentioned in an interview that he delivered a presentation in which he first disclosed all the data and only mentioned anomalous cognition at the very end. He waited until the scientists in the audience accepted what they were hearing before informing them where the cohort came from. Naturally, it appears that the researchers are concerned about the stigma that may be associated with this sort of research.

Subjects of the study include special forces personnel, members of the intelligence community, workers of aerospace firms, military officers, military base guards, and police officers. Their injuries frequently occur during military missions like an overnight operation at a guarded site, reconnaissance, or some other type of exploration. The injuries are frequently caused by something that is aerial and produces light or a beam. Dr. Nolan acknowledged in a 2019 interview that some of the allegations of abnormal incidents are supported by numerous eye-witness evidence.

Garry Nolan discusses the extremely important physiological and genetic anomalies observed in people who claim to have experienced UAP experiences, among other things, in a 2-hour interview.

The study focuses on the caudate and putamen regions of the brain, which are the seat of intuition, “and anomalous cognition could match up with the intuitive processes in the brain,” according to Dr. Garry Nolan in an interview with Journalist Linda Moulton Howe. The medical history of the subjects, as well as their reports of their experiences, were gathered. There were MRIs of their bodies, MRIs of their brains, or both for many of them.

The brain scans piqued people’s curiosity since the individuals showed characteristics that differed from the usual. This was initially misinterpreted as injury, but after more discussion, it was shown to be extra fibers between the caudate and putamen. Dr. Nolan refers to the existence of these additional nerve bundles as “connections” (or white matter tracts). Anomaly cognition was characterized using many possibilities; it might be improved intuition or individuals getting information from sources other than their usual senses, but Dr. Nolan also left open the idea that it could just be a sign of insanity — perceptions of non-reality.

The caudate-putamen area was once thought to be involved with motor coordination, it is now thought to be downstream of the brain’s executive processes. It takes in many inputs and makes judgments depending on them. This would be a reasonable location to explore if you wanted to find where rapid judgments are made with scant data. If aberrant information enters the brain, it will most likely be processed by the area where the extra fibers were discovered in the cohort. All of the participants in the research had one thing in common: they are all “high functioning” intellectually. Another hypothesis is that the cohort simply consists of a group of clever people with the capacity to make fast judgments.

A number of research participants went on to obtain brain scans of their family relatives, and sure enough, a genetic relationship was discovered. It did not appear to be a gender-related characteristic. Parents were likely to pass it on to their children, suggesting that the genes involved might be fairly compact and close together. One unexpected finding was that husband and wife couples were considerably more likely to have the characteristic as if something was drawing these individuals together. There might be very excellent reasons for this, such as a demographic bias — individuals with the characteristic end up on similar pathways and are more likely to meet, or clever people just prefer other smart people.

Although it’s easy to envision a supernatural/telepathic rationale for individuals being brought together in this fashion, Dr. Nolan cautions us that the evidence doesn’t allow us to go that far just yet. He cites testing for skin graft compatibility and how they tend to correspond (in mice) with attraction or repulsion based on olfactory perceptions (sense of smell) and heredity. Other than unorthodox answers, it’s critical not to overlook the plethora of known and unknown subconscious variables that might be at work.

Dr. Nolan is being meticulous in his caution since it is critical not to arm the ‘pathological doubters’ with assumptions.

Dr. Nolan highlights the quantum physics phenomenon known as quantum entanglement as another possible method for moving this sort of study ahead. Proteins that change their structure in response to an abnormal signal. He refers to the DNA strains that process these signals as ‘antennas.’ When questioned if these genetic characteristics (antennas) are pre-existing, Dr. Nolan states that there has been no documented change in the presence or absence of distinctive nerve bundles throughout time. In other words, the bodily indicators are there throughout a person’s life.

When asked if they are “activated,” he invokes several ideas that have been proposed, such as the concept that there is a learning effect in which experiencing anomalous cognition once might lead to a fresh ability to absorb anomalous information later. It’s like trying to find a volume knob. A traumatic experience, a kundalini event, or any sort of contact might initiate a process in which nerves that are not normally used are abruptly activated.

Dr. Nolan confirms that the distinctive attribute is present in a statistically significant proportion of his cohort of experiencers (nerve bundles). Some of those people claim to have had contact with UAP. Although most allegations cannot be validated, the bulk of the persons were military personnel who had “verifiable events”.

A variable that makes results difficult to replicate (with “spider-sense” research and remote viewing investigations) is that the first “flash of inspiration” is usually of interest; as soon as you add overlays of thinking and interpretation, you go further away from the signal. It would be feasible to assure better repeatability if we could somehow catch the signal as it occurred.

Mind Over Water

While Dr. Green and Dr. Nolan’s research focuses on the physiological and biochemical markers of experiencers. There have previously been studies conducted by the U.S. Department of Defense, as well as the Soviet Union that demonstrate exceptional talents by individuals. Igor B. Verbitsky, an experiencer, was requested to influence the acidity (pH) of water or water solutions in one investigation. He worked for three to five minutes at a distance of 20 to 30 centimeters from the flask. The solution in question was put in a water thermostat. The effects were found at an assortment of temperatures that were used. Only when the target solution was constantly agitated by a magnetic or mechanical mixer were these changes detected. Verbitsky said that his work on influencing pH was a learning process: at first, he could only generate very minor changes in pH, but today he is able to modify the acidity by 1.5 units of pH.

Distant Effect on Mice

Dr. Sergei Speransky of the Institute of Hygiene in Novosibirsk conducted a new study on the effect of an operator on the physiology of mice. Speransky, a toxicologist, examines abnormal occurrences using conventional techniques. Speransky and his helper Kukharenko were blind to which group was the test group, as there were 12 white mice in the test group and 12 in the control group. Lesya Gorbovets, an experienced and well-known healer, performed the randomization (a coin flip) shortly prior to the testing. Gorbovets tried to impact a randomly selected group of mice in Novosibirsk from Moscow for one hour, the start of which was set by Speransky. Mice from both the test and control groups were poisoned with carbon tetrachloride prior to the attempt (the same dose for both groups). Gorbovets’ goal was therefore to positively impact (i.e., heal) the mice in the test group while leaving the control group alone.

Two days later, seven mice (58%) died in one group, whereas no mice perished in the other. When the condition was revealed, it was discovered that the group in which all mice survived was the test group that had been treated to the anomalous phenomena effect. It is worth noting that Gorbovets was the second operator to succeed in Speransky’s trials.

While it is apparent that the research to this point favors anomalous perturbation as an underlying process, the debate in academia is far from decided, with a perceptual (selection) model also being explored. Many researchers are concerned about the possible harmful applications of AMP since an abnormal phenomenon indicates the possibility of both good and negative impacts on biological systems. These worries will be alleviated if the process is shown to be correlational rather than causative. Significant independent and collaborative research is required to resolve this mechanistic question. We’ve only scratched the surface.

Memories of Previous Lives

Another sort of anomalous phenomenon is being investigated. Some young children, generally between the ages of two and five, talk about recollections from a former life they claim to have experienced. At the same time, they frequently exhibit characteristics, such as phobias or preferences, that are unique within the framework of their family and cannot be explained by current life circumstances. These recollections appear to corroborate the child’s claims about a prior existence.

In many cases of this sort, the child’s statements have been proven to correlate accurately to facts about a deceased person’s life and death.

Some of the infants have birthmarks and birth abnormalities that match scars or other markings on the deceased person whose life the kid is commemorating. Postmortem studies have verified these correspondences in a number of situations. Older children may maintain these visible memories, although they appear to diminish around the age of seven. The young people involved in these incidents have been discovered all across the world, including Europe and North America.

Dr. Jim Tucker, currently the director of the Division of Perceptual Studies, has spent the last 20 years focusing mostly on cases from the United States. Return to Life, his book contains descriptions of very strong American examples of young infants who recall prior incarnations. Dr. Tucker discusses the now-famous instances of James Leininger, a young child who had verified past-life memories of being a WWII pilot, and Ryan Hammons, who had valid past-life recollections of being a Hollywood extra and talent agent, in this book.

As our understanding grows, it is quite likely that quantum mechanics will play a significant role in explaining the abnormalities. For the time being, we should be grateful that academics and scientists are prepared to devote decades of hard effort to issues that many deem taboo and unworthy of scientific investigation. The findings and data being gathered definitely convey a tale of interest and mystery about how the cosmos works and our role within it.

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